Go to Catania (Sicily)

Etna: A Living Mountain​

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Peaking at 3.330 metres above sea level, this is the highest volcano in Europe. Mount Etna is occasionally active and a pronounced UNESCO World Natural Heritage Site.​ Centuries of eruptions have changed the surrounding landscape: from moon-like fields to chestnut forests, from the coast of the Ionian Sea to citrus fields. Etna is a tourist magnet of Sicily and has lost none of its fiery fascination.

Italia

Ascent to the Summit

Climbing the summit of Mount Etna is the top hike in Sicily! In small guided groups you will learn a lot about the mountain and its history. You will also walk across a warm lava river on the way up. The trek is moderately difficult and requires sturdy shoes. The march takes about five hours. Beware of the temperatures at the top, as they can be unpleasantly cold even during the warm season. Hence, a thick jacket, woolly hat and gloves are recommended.

Etna 3340

First Downhill, then Lido

Winter sports season on Mount Etna, the southernmost ski area in Europe, is between December and April. Those who ski here have a magnificent view over the east coast of Sicily and two options. Nicolosi offers just under 9 km of downhill skiing and 10 km of cross-country trails while Linguaglossa offers five T-bar lifts with smaller slopes and 16 km of cross-country trails. From there, it is only 28 km to the seaside resort of Taormina. However, we do not recommend a dip in the sea before April.

Etnasci (Italian)

Etna is a hotspot for wine lovers. The DOC Etna wine growing area, ranging in altitude from 650 to 1200 metres above sea level, produces excellent wines on the volcanic lava soil. ​ The oldest winery on Mount Etna is Barone di Villagrande and has been family run since 1727. It played a pivotal role in the establishment of the local identity of Etna wines when winemaker Carmelo started bottling varietal wines in 1941. Visits and reservations at reservation@villagrande.it

Bellevue (German)

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